Bird Conservation Area

Key BCA Criteria:

 

  • Migratory concentration site

  • Diverse species concentration site

  • Individual species concentration site

  • Species at risk site

 

The Caumsett BCA is within Caumsett State Historic Park. Caumsett is part of NY Audubon's Huntington and Northport Bays' Important Bird Area. It is on Lloyd Neck, a peninsula on the north shore of Long Island jutting out into Long Island Sound. The Caumsett BCA is special because it has a variety of habitats that attract many different species of birds. About two-thirds of the Caumsett BCA is forest, predominately oak-tulip tree forest. Other habitats include successional old field, low salt marsh, marine eelgrass meadow, maritime beach, successional shrub land and salt shrub. The Caumsett BCA is also an important stopover for migratory songbirds that fly over Long Island Sound. Caumsett offers a variety of education and recreation programs including fishing, hiking, birding, nature photography, nature study and guided tours. The site supports a high diversity of migratory birds, especially forest dwelling Neotropical migrants. Breeding birds include several species listed in New York as endangered, threatened or of special concern: Osprey (special concern), Piping Plover (state endangered and federal threatened), Common Tern (state threatened) and Least Tern (state threatened). Other state-listed species observed at Caumsett include Common Loon (special concern), Bald Eagle (state and federal threatened), Northern Harrier (threatened), Sharp-shinned Hawk (special concern), Cooper's Hawk (special concern), Northern Goshawk (special concern), Red-shouldered Hawk (special concern), Golden Eagle (endangered), Peregrine Falcon (endangered), Short-eared Owl (endangered), Whip-poor-will (special concern), Red-headed Woodpecker (special concern), Vesper Sparrow (special concern) and Grasshopper Sparrow (special concern). Piping Plovers have nested at Lloyd Point since at least 1988 with up to 13 nesting pairs. Least Terns have nested nearly every year since at least 1977 with up to 100 pairs breeding at the Point. Common Terns first nested in 1998. Protection and management of nestlings and fledglings of these species at risk is done by State Parks. All three of these species are surveyed annually as part of the Long Island Colonial Waterbird and Piping Plover Survey.

© 2019  The Caumsett Foundation

P O Box 1948

Huntington, NY 11743 

info@caumsettfoundation.org

park phone: 631-423-1770

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Eastern Towhee

Photo by Ken Feustel